04/07/14 – Today at #tuttle

Some notes I made from today’s conversations which included @tonyhall @freecloud & @tibocut with a fortunate postscript one-to-one for me with @mistergough

The RFH was being used today for a graduation ceremony.  That chimed with my recognition that some people have “graduated” from Tuttle and that’s worth celebrating.

On the other side of the glass #tuttle
MayDay Rooms is a safe haven for historical material linked to social movements, experimental culture and the radical expression of marginalised figures and groups. It offers communal spaces to activate archives’ potential in relation to current struggles and informal research, challenging the widespread assault on collective memory and historical continuity. MDR is located in Fleet Street, Central London, but is informally linked in inspiration, collaboration and practice with an international network of common and concurrent initiatives.”

Thinking about archives as a way of seeing oneself through media but also recontextualising yourself – which I take to mean seeing what different things in you are reflected by your contact with archive materials.

Personal stories are much more interesting than the facts, which can be discovered for oneself – if you’re telling me a story about a stone that you picked up on a beach, the geology of the stone is the least interesting part (unless within that there is some personal connection).

There are always lots of little social things going on that no-one knows about.

What alternatives are there in the space between mesh networks and the “legacy” Internet?

Instagram and Twitter as a treasure hunt.  We leave trails of where we’ve been, what we’ve seen, what we’re doing for others to pick up and enjoy and follow the path.

What’s this #tuttle reboot all about? What is it that needs to be revived, what’s it for, what’s it supposed to do, has it done it already?

Watson at IBM – looks amazing, looks like magic – do those explaining how it works really understand it themselves?  What is the complexity under the surface?  How much do you get to know once you’ve “signed on the line that is dotted”?

Help me reboot #tuttle

The most frequently asked question about #tuttle is: “Is it still going?”  To which the answer is “Yes, still Fridays, still 10am-noon, still no agenda, currently on Level 5 at RFH”

And.  We operate on a much smaller pool of people, which means the possibility of more intimate conversation (I’ve had some doozies!), but also the risk of stagnation that lack of diversity brings.

I am often reassured that “it’s not about you, Lloyd, it’s about me:  I have work to do; I don’t manage my time well enough; I’d love to come but it’s just too far if I haven’t anything else in town; I’m always thinking about coming, it’s just that…”

I’m also reminded regularly that people do still long for space to be themselves, where no-one tells them what to do and they can talk about what they want to talk about without an expected outcome/output/powerpoint/post-its on the wall.  A thing that’s not about the thing but about the relationships and potential for things to happen that builds over time.

I’ve been thinking about this for a while, but talking to Jon Hickman for his article on Social Capital has helped me remember what a good thing this can be and how I don’t believe the time for it has passed.  Stories about online social networks spying on us and manipulating our streams to study our emotional responses as well as the constant drip, drip of acquisitions that lead either to sunsetting or unscrupulous use of personal data – these are the things we’ve talked about and organised against in places like #tuttle but my experience of the current crop of events is that these conversations are still squeezed into the breaks and space after the main speaker rather than the focus of getting together in the first place.

So how can you help?

Firstly, you can just come along.  No need to register or submit your details anywhere, just turn up at the Royal Festival Hall sometime between 10 and noon and chat (and bring someone with you if you want).

Secondly you can  help me develop a sustainable model for me keeping this thing going and making it better over time.  The main issue has always been that while others have built working relationships and created opportunities, I’ve had a massive injection of Social Capital which is hard to pay the rent with.  I also don’t really want to take money from outside the community while understanding that some people in the community don’t have a lot of money to give.

I’m looking at Patreon as a micro-patronage platform for subscriptions toward developing and rebooting the event.  Some of you have kindly “micro-patronised” me before – the difference this time is that I’d want to tie levels of support to some pretty specific goals and to allow for much lower donations per person.  Patreon offers both these functions.

In connection with that, you can help me by suggesting what those goals might be.  So far I’ve got:

  • Working with new venue(s);
  • Creating an online presence more worthy of 2014 than 2007;
  • Reviving Tuttle Consulting;
  • Setting up a marketplace for #tuttlers to sell their wares;
  • Doing other themed events for the community.

But I need to know what else?  What did you always wish would happen either at  or between  #tuttles if only somebody could take the time to?

So let me know what you think about any of that: Yes? No? Yes. but do it another way? No, but have you ever thought of?

Thankyou!

Podcast: @jonhickman asked me about social capital

Jon Hickman is writing an article on the crowdsourced journalism site, Contributoria on whether or not you can live on social capital.   He kindly thought that my experiences wandering around the United States of America might provide some insight, so we had a chat.   Even if you’ve heard me talk about it before, you might find it interesting to hear it from this perspective.  I’ll certainly be fascinated to compare this conversation with how Jon’s article turns out.

Download (66MB)

It coincides nicely with the fact that I finally got round to releasing Version 0.1 of the Please Look After This Englishman e-book – this one contains all the blog posts before, during and after the trip. I intend to refine and develop this product (hence the Version 0.1 tag) so if you do download it, I’d love to hear your ideas for other ways to present the story or particular parts that you’d like to hear more about.

Update: The e-book is now also available on Amazon if that makes it easier for you.  Although it costs you more plus Big A  take a greater percentage and take longer to pay me than Gumroad.  Of course, it’s not about the money! :)

Podcast: Hello Dave! with @davebriggs

Download (69MB)

We recorded this early last week, but I’ve been holding it back because I didn’t have time to listen to it in order to come up with the usually obsessively and irrelevantly detailed show-notes.  But that’s stupid.   So for this episode, if there’s anything in there that you want to know more about and but can’t Google, leave a comment and I’ll see if I can explain.

The gist of it all is this: Lloyd’s just been to the osteopath and so is feeling a bit groggy.  Fans of the chronic self-deprecating chunter about tech(ish), social(ish), community(ish) matters are unlikely to be disappointed.

If you want to hear Dave on a proper podcast, talking to a proper person, you can find the relevant RSS here.

May 14

Pete Seeger visiting steel drum makers and players in Trinidad

Moving Doctors

  • I just got round to registering with a local doctor, five years after I left the area where I was previously registered. I know this is bad. I mean it’s good to put it right, but it’s bad that it’s taken me this long. About a year of that time I was on the road, but still.
  • I think I made a move towards it when I was living in Chesson Road, but I think that move was “pick up the forms from the surgery”. I don’t think it went any further.
  • I’m not ill. I feel good, but clearly something has shifted, since today was the fifth day in a row that I walked more than five miles and now I’m willing to register and probably go in for a check-up. I am fortunate, I have not had any serious illnesses or injuries, I have never spent a night in hospital. I’ve had a couple of visits to A&E after carelessness on the stairs, oh and the times I dislocated my shoulders at college. I’m not a heavy user of the NHS.
  • And so the medical questionnaire was straightforward. I needed to disclose that my dad had an aortic valve replacement a couple of years ago at age 74. Given the heritability of that condition, I suppose it would be sensible to have my heart checked and as I approach 50, I think they encourage you to have a range of checks regularly. Part of me says “well if you go looking for stuff, you’re likely to find it”. But I think it’s better self-care to have checks rather than self-diagnosing every twinge and soreness, every bit of life that could be a symptom of something horrible.
  • It did help that I could do it all by filling in two online forms (although I rolled my eyes a bit when I had to repeat information in the second one).

“Steven Melendez asserted that monegraph could “eradicate fake digital art”, when this is exactly backwards. In fact monegraph makes it possible to have “fake digital art”, because prior to this we had no consistent way of defining an “original”.” – Anil Dash

Podcast: Ouch! with @davebriggs

Dave and Lloyd chat about early blogging, deleting blogs, thinking about workflow, outlining, working with Fargo! and WordPress, interspersed with Lloyd’s cluelessness about the basic dangers of electricity.

Download (45MB)

“The interesting thing about Bank Holidays…”
- Lloyd’s recap of his early blogging
- The actual first (undeleted) post on Perfect Path
- Dave Winer’s Noteblog Format
- Digital Team Blogs at DH
- GTD – the five phases of work
- Lloyd on Instagram
- Posting to WordPress from Fargo
- Getting WordPress content back into Fargo
- WXR is the WordPress XML format
Ouch!
- The source for wp2opml on Github
- The tuttle2texas blog (imported from posterous)
- Somewhere.com
The Somewhere post was the same post as the early blogging post.
Ouch! Again!
- Day One
- Try Doorbell Episode Three
- BERG Weeknotes
- Narrating Your Work

Fargo to WordPress Formatting Bug

I often use Fargo to compose posts on my wordpress.com blog.

But I’ve just seen a problem with formatting when you use the outline structuring for a list.

Here’s a list:

  • This item is at the top level of a list
    • It has a sub-entry
    • And another
  • And this is the second item in the list
  • And this the third.

I expect this to render as a bulleted list, instead it looks like a block of code – except when I updated the post with the following screenshots, the formatting was automatically corrected.

Here’s a screenshot of how it looked in Fargo:

Screen Shot 2014-04-16 at 13.45.59

And how it looked in the edit window of WordPress

Screen Shot 2014-04-16 at 13.46.56

I'm the founder of the Tuttle Club and fascinated by organisation. I enjoy making social art and building communities, if you'd like some help from me feel free to e-mail me: Lloyd dot Davis at Gmail dot Com or call +44 (0)79191 82825

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