Tag Archives: london

What @amandapalmer reminded me about street performing #AFP #llobo

The only people who can possibly not have seen or heard about Amanda Palmer‘s TED Talk from last week yet are those who resist words of wisdom on principle, or perhaps those poor bastards who restrict their internet time to “serious stuff”.

If you’re in one of those categories and you read this blog, a) I’d be surprised and b) get over to her site and have a look, go on.  It firmly places AFP and her hubby as the goto motivators for creative people of the here and now – “Make Good Art …and… Let People Pay You For It!” 

Anyhow, the first time I heard her talk about her experience as the eight-foot bride and how that informed her relationship to her “audience” now, what I said on twitter in response was “thank you for reminding me that being a street performer is more than OK, it’s a job”

It’s a job, it’s part of my work.  It’s part of my overall contribution to the happiness of my community, and I’m rewarded in many more ways than the pile of coins in my uke case.

I’ve been meaning to write something for a long time (actually it occurs to me every time I go out to play) about what busking has taught me about my business.  But I couldn’t find a decent frame for it – it kept coming out as a translation from what I knew to be true to the sort of language that “business people” understand (yikes!) and too much was being lost in translation.

So here’s what it’s really been like for me.  You do your own translation.

My first sober, adult experience of busking was on the tube.  It’s not the same as the street, but I had a licence for a year and it gave me a good grounding in just standing there with my ukulele, showing up, playing, singing, getting tipped, getting ignored, getting occasionally and very mildly abused.  I also got to meet a few other buskers at the swap-over time, made some friends, was able to talk about the common nuisances of being a tube-busker.  And I heard a story over and over that made me uncomfortable.  It was that people are horrible, they hate buskers, they don’t want us there, they think we’re beggars, they’re mean and ungrateful and we give much more than they reward.   Which wasn’t really my experience, I’d already clocked that the best way to get through a two-hour session playing at, say, Bond St, where you’re in a tunnel between the platform and the escalator hall, so everybody’s always zipping past, is to lock-on to people and smile and give your performance to them, give your all to that one person right now and when they’ve gone, let them go.  And yeah, some of them are grumpy and embarrassed and ignore you or tell you to “Shut up!” or “Get a Job!” but then when I had a job and I was always on the way somewhere else and I saw someone spending their time doing what they love, I probably was a bit grumpy too.  The other thing is, you’re in the middle of one of the busiest transport networks in the world – people don’t go there for entertainment, they go there to get somewhere else, quickly.

Still, the money was rubbish.  And I kept trying to find some correlation between what I was doing and what ended up in the pot.  And there wasn’t any really, one day certain songs would “work”, the next day the same songs would bomb.  Some days I’d get an endless stream of 10p and coppers, others, nobody would give anything except for one guy who tossed in £5.  I kept telling myself to give up trying to work it out, but then when I was there on the pitch and my stomach was rumbling and I’d already laid out for a tube ticket and I somehow had to fix it so that I could make them get that money out of their pocket and into my uke case.  But that never worked.  I gave up my tube licence mainly because of the way the scheme was managed, but also it was just too hit and miss as a means of income.

And so I left it.  I stopped busking for a couple of years.  And in the meantime I did other things, I put into practice lots of ideas I had about organising without organisations, I tried out crowdfunding for projects and I couchsurfed and I went coast-to-coast across the USA twice with the help of my online social network.  And then I went completely homeless and hobo-style and spent a year on the road going where you and the digital world took me and paid me and fed me and gave me (some very nice) rooves over my head.

And while I was on the road that year, I picked up the busking habit again.  I’d found in the USA that carrying my uke around everywhere was a great social opener, so why not put it to use when I was on my own?

And this time it was different.  I was different.  I had a different attitude.  I can’t pretend that I instantly transformed, I still had a rumbling tum and empty pockets much of the time and I *was* doing it for the money, but I was less attached to making it happen, making them get their money out, making them put it in the pot.  Something just clicked, on the street, in a way that I hadn’t felt in the tube, that the amount in the pot was none of my business until I got to the end of the set.  And how it got there was none of my business either.  My job was to entertain these people to the best of my ability and trust that I would be rewarded.  It took some practice, I’d often drift off into control-mode again, but I kept pulling myself back, like a meditation, to remembering that my job there is to collect smiles – to get as much eye-contact and human connection as possible in the few moments from when they approached to when the passed.  And I regularly make about twice as much as I ever did on the tube.

I also have way more fun and if there is any key factor that correlates with how much money is there at the end, it’s how much fun I had.  I’ve learned too to just let people give.  Some people want to give me food and drink – when I started out, I’d decline, politely, letting them know that I can’t eat cookies, for example.  Now, I take it all with a smile and thanks and pass on the stuff my digestive system can’t cope with to the guys and gals who are sitting out on the street who don’t have a ukulele or a talent for singing.

So what I’m really grateful for, Amanda, is the reminder that my job is not what I think it is.  My job isn’t to rake in the dosh.  My job is to collect smiles, human connections, hugs, and  to generate conversation, laughter at or laughter with and to ignore the hecklers. No matter what it is that I’m doing, those are the metrics that count.

I’ve become comfortable lately saying “I don’t do *anything* full-time”.  And I certainly couldn’t busk full-time, my fingers and voice wouldn’t hack it.  But I like to get out there from time to time and I’m looking at ways of doing street-like performance that gets the intimacy but doesn’t require me to freeze. And so I try also to carry the spirit of my street performance into all the work I do, give my best and let people give back what they want to.   

Thanks, see you on the street.

My first #wewillgather in Wandsworth today

We launched #wewillgather at Nesta on Tuesday.  I did the live demo – code just out of beta, interfacing with third-party software (twitter) in front of Nesta’s head of innovation and the Minister for Civil Society not to mention some of my dearest peers from the various corners of the social web. So no pressure…

But it worked!

Not as quickly as it had done in the dry-run a week before, but nonetheless, I set up an event in the system just by sending a tweet.

I was inspired at that moment to make it something close to home.  I’ve just moved to Wandsworth and Wandsworth Town railway station has just got new ticket machines and ticket barriers.  However, it doesn’t have new bins handy to deal with all the unwanted receipts and other tickets that get left behind in the mad commuter rush.  These tickets just pile up and don’t seem to be dealt with by station staff or the streetsweeper.

There’s a choice of solutions: ignore it and hope someone else will do something about it;  write to South West Trains who manage the station and Wandsworth Council to encourage them to do something about it; or use a newly minted social website to arrange to meet some people there and take  a small broom and clear it up yourself.

So I used this as my example in the demo and set up for people to come along this morning to pick up tickets.

Of course I did nothing further to organise people yesterday as I was mostly dealing with other people using the site, and so no-one else came.  Except my long-suffering girlfriend, a bit embarrassed that I’d brought the tatty dustpan brush that was supposed to have gone in the rubbish itself.  But I was undaunted – I’m used to playing Billy No-Mates when things are in their early days.

When we arrived, as luck would have it, the station staff were refilling the ticket machine.  You can see the mess around the front.  It’s clearly not their job to clear that up at the same time.

Inadvertently chose the time for #wewillgather to coincide with ticket refilling

So I waited for them to finish before I started poking around with my broom around the back and sides of the machine. They disappeared quickly (I think they might also have been collecting cash from the machine) and I couldn’t find them to talk to afterwards. My broom wasn’t long enough to get all of the tickets from behind – it’s a really awkward space, if I had brought a bigger broom then perhaps the head wouldn’t have fitted into the gap. Anyway I did what I could and photographed what was left behind

IMAG0725

as well as what I managed to collect (which then went straight in the nearest bin)

IMAG0726

Hmmm… it looks as though I picked up less than I left behind, but that’s not the case, the perspective on that Sainsbury’s bag is misleading.

Anyway, you can do better than this – go and organise something in *your* neighbourhood!

#media140 – the wifi thing

I don't need your steenkin hairdryersI want to be clear that I think that anyone who has a go at running an event in central London for a couple of hundred people to try to understand something about how this real-time web stuff changes the way the world works deserves our admiration and gratitude, so salutes to Ande, Kate and the rest of the media140 team.

Now about the wifi – and it’s probably not what you think.

In my view, wireless connectivity to the internet for the modern conference is up there with electricity and hot and cold running water as an essential utility that guests should just expect to be there and working. Its lack is not as immediate a physical risk as for those other utilities, where we’d be bumbling around in the dark or stepping gingerly through each other’s waste products but it is a major inconvenience in a world where participants in events have come to expect the ability to upload content, see what others have uploaded, reference material that’s being talked about on stage and talk to each other in backchannels.

No wifi means we can’t play in a big part of the game. It’s as if we’d had a power cut and tried to carry on with candlelight. It also has consequences for quality reporting of what’s going on to those who couldn’t make it along and longer term for people trying to understand something that they heard in the middle of someone’s speech but can’t quite remember what it was or how it was nuanced.

So surely it’s the conference organizer’s fault when it goes wrong. I don’t think so. I think that if we’d turned up at RIBA and there happened to be a power cut in that part of W1 and no prospect of electricity for the rest of the day, we certainly wouldn’t have taken a swipe at the production team, instead a couple of things might have happened – firstly, I would expect insurance to have been taken out for such a thing to cover the costs of refunding participants and the costs of the conference on the day. Secondly, we’d (well some of us would) have probably nipped over to Regents Park and held an impromptu conversation along the lines that we’d previously intended.

I’d also expect RIBA as a conference centre to be dealing with it, not dumping it on the organizer.

But let’s put that aside for a moment. Let’s assume that there’s a great supply, with reserves and generators in the basement to make sure failure of the national grid doesn’t kill the ability to host something.

The trouble is, to the wifi supplier, a conference like media140 is the 21st Century equivalent of a hair-dryer salesman’s convention in the 1930s to the fledgling electricity companies – all sorts of nutcases march in with power-hungry devices, all wanting to show off what their gadget can do and scrambling for the power sockets as soon as they get into the room. Even worse than that (and I suspect this is the real culprit) they bring hair-drying devices that automatically grab hold of power as soon as they come into the building – even if they’re in the owner’s pocket or briefcase. Can you imagine?!

There was a time when conference organizers were constantly reminding people to turn off their mobile phones. Perhaps we should be asking people now to just make sure that you keep your wifi-enabled device on 3G only until you really need to connect quickly and that all automatically wifi-grabbing applications are killed before you enter the building.

So iPhones are the new Handy Hannah – that’s what I learned at #media140

Photo by Paul Clarke

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G20: Tom Watson MP

I also asked Tom why people should care about what goes on at the summit and he explains the importance of what the bloggers were doing to help us all make sense of the high-level economic stuff from our own perspectives.

Tom is one of the earliest adopters of online social tools among national politicians and he uses them to complement the doorstep manner that makes him a popular local MP. I remember hearing about his early blogging through Tim Ireland in 2004. He’s matured well with the rest of us – he’s a top choice to follow on twitter, skillfully navigating the line between speaking as just another tweeter and speaking as an MP and Government Minister.

Tom sat with us on the G20 Voice desk all day, even when he was in danger of being crushed by the hack-pack when Bob Geldof passed by.

G20 Voice starting

IMG_0121Still not entirely sure what to do with this opportunity. My instinct is to look for the stuff that other people aren’t covering or noticing. So I included in my intro tags #hiddenstories.

So I expect mainstream media to lead on soap opera stuff between Brown, Obama and Sarkozy.

I expect many people to lead on the sorts of things being talked about here by Oxfam – a rescue & financial stimulus package for poorer countries.

I’m interested in how social media is actually being used to open up the conversation – you may have seen a reference to me in Rory Cellan-Jones’s post yesterday and it’s the middle bit that is interesting, how “ordinary people” who aren’t directly involved in the summit and who aren’t interested in throwing bricks at bankers can take part in the important decisions that are being made at the moment. I’m not suggesting that we can be a direct line between you and the Prime Minister or Mr President but can we be more of a two-way medium? Can we, should we, how should we be doing more than either being a reporter or being a lobbyist?

Keeping thinking and talking and listening here.