Tag Archives: meetups

Meetups in the USA! with @technokitten & @jamestagg

Yo, America!  I missed you.  I’m coming back.

I’m helping organise and will be attending a series of meetup events in the first week in May.  I’m working on this with Helen Keegan of Mobile Heroes and James Tagg of Truphone.

Helen and James will be in the Bay Area on 2nd & 3rd.  I’m joining them in NYC later in the week and going over to LA with them for an evening do the following Monday.  I’m hoping to see my SF peeps after that as I’ll have a few days holiday before coming home.

All the events are free and fun!  The first is Helen’s world-famous Swedish Beers Party which will be in San Francisco on May 2nd.  The others are talks with James (and other speakers to be confirmed) on the subject of AI and the future of mobile, entitled: “When will our smartphones be smarter than us?”

There’ll be a brunch down in Mountain View the following morning, May 3rd.

We’re doing something breakfast-y in Manhattan on Thursday May 5th.

We will likely do a Tuttle NYC on the morning of Friday 6th but that will be even more informal and become clearer when we’ve booked accommodation.

We’ll be doing the final one in Los Angeles on the evening of Monday 9th.

We’re working hard at the moment to pin down venues but want you to save the dates in your city and spread the word.  If we’re Facebook friends you should get an invite there too, but since FB search is rubbish, don’t bet on it.  All the events are here on FB, please pass on the invitation to anyone who would be interested.

We also still have openings for additional speakers and sponsors so if that’s you, please get in touch (first name dot last name at gmail!)

See you soon!

 

 

The long-tail of face-to-face

The gentle end of the Tuttle ClubI don’t know where I’m going with this one, but I’m musing about some attitudes that I see popping up around face-to-face events.

One seems to be: Big is beautiful (or at least successful) ie in order for an event to be considered a success, you have to have loads of people there. I disagree. I look at Tuttle and shudder at the idea of there regularly being 100 people there. I find it’s pushing the format to have more than 50. New people seem to expect me to be disappointed if there are fewer people this week than last week. I keep telling them that it’s OK, I’ve experienced nobody turning up to something I’ve arranged, and it didn’t kill me. I think that I’m going to always represent an extreme of Tuttle attendee, if anyone’s going to make sure they meet everyone in the room then it’s going to be me. And meeting 40 people in 3 hours is a lot, fairly comfortable, but nearing the maximum.

Now that’s not to say that I don’t think big events are any good. I enjoyed Web2.0 and I’m sure I’ll enjoy LeWeb08 which is going to be huge. What I’m trying to say is that I don’t think size is a sign of success, it’s just a sign of, well, how big something is…

Another side of this is the feeling that everyone’s got to go to everything. OK, so it’s not that bad, but I do see people feeling like they are seriously missing out by not getting to go to things. And I know that’s how I’ve felt as well. We tell ourselves that we know that no-one can go to everything and surely no-one can be that interested in everything, and if you spent all your time going to things, you wouldn’t get anything done. But still, it would be just my luck that it will be this event that I’m not going to where something brilliant and amazing and paradigm-shifting will happen, something that the attendees will remember for ever and tell their grandchildren about, and level of awesome that will never be repeated in our lifetimes.

I think we’re going to be doing more and more of these meetups, scaling from 4 or 5 right up to the thousands and recognising that we don’t need to go to everything just because it’s there, any more than we can buy, listen to and enjoy every CD available on Amazon.

In fact I’m personally going to be choosing to attend things that are the 4 or 5 right people to talk about a very niche, specific subject – I still love 40 people on a Friday, but next I want to add in some smaller, more focused things. Note, that the “right” people doesn’t necessarily imply the best, brightest, coolest, sexiest, funniest or any of those things. It just means, if anything at all, the most appropriate.