All posts by Lloyd

During The E Word at Channel 4

Dave HarrisThis is the second of three podcasts I’ve produced associated with The Policy Unplugged event at Channel 4 last week, The E Word. Fifty or so thinkers in education – without many of the usual Whitehall suspects gathered to talk about the state of education policy in the UK, to see where there was common ground and explore their differences. I was there as a host with special responsibility to help record the day and capture the essence of the conversations.

After introducing themselves to each other and discussing their passions about education, the guests gathered around subjects that had emerged in the discussion. I joined a table hosted by Victoria Marks to talk about Lifelong Learning. In this section you hear from Pat Kane, Tom Bewick, Dave Harris, Marion Seguret, Victoria and err… Lloyd Davis.

During The E Word (19:03 mins – 8.7MB)

Photos for the event are in this photoset

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“Before” The E Word at Channel 4

PolicyUnplugged 003This is the first of three podcasts I’ve produced associated with The Policy Unplugged event at Channel 4 last week, The E Word. Fifty or so thinkers in education – without many of the usual Whitehall suspects gathered to talk about the state of education policy in the UK, to see where there was common ground and explore their differences. I was there as a host with special responsibility to help record the day and capture the essence of the conversations.

First off, I spent some time mingling with the guests, finding out what they were expecting from the event.

Before The E Word (11:49 mins – 5.4MB)

Photos for the event are in this photoset

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Saira Khan meets London bloggers

saira khanAfter the e-word extravaganza (yeah, yeah stuff’s coming) I popped down to Fulham to meet up with Saira Khan who’s reporting on blogging for BBC Radio Five, but who British TV audiences will know as “that feisty, gobby woman with the megaphone who should have won” from The Apprentice. I’m so glad that when I wrote here about the show earlier in the year, I was nice about Saira and picked her (or James) to win. Note to people in the rest of the world – Saira was pipped to the post (as I also kind of predicted) by the dull but worthy Tim.

So anyway, we had a great chat – Geoff Jones was being interviewed as I approached the ‘crowd’ consisting of Suw Charman and two other guys who I’d seen before, but never got really introduced to, so I can’t tell you who they were with any certainty, though I think one hangs out here and the other is here but they could both be the same guy… or not. We were joined a little while later by Sal – everyone seemed to be Australian, but that’s not a bad thing.

[Update: Alan Connor was there too, doh! my brain! and he’s now kindly linked to this piece in one of his Weblog Watch pieces for the BBC News Magazine section – hello people from BBC-land]

Saira was delightful, excitable, very sweet and clearly easily drawn into the Perfect Path charm machine. She’s also just amazed that there’s this enormous subculture that she didn’t know existed until recently. We recorded a little interview (I believe it’s going to be part of the Julian Worricker Show and it’s called the 5 Live Report due to be broadcast at 10:00 BST on October 2nd – should be listenable across the globe through the BBC player for a week thereafter. I also got to meet the lovely Clare, who’s producing the show (and is a closet podcaster who’s about to jump out and reveal herself as such)

The bar we were in was visited by some wandering masseuses and you can read about my massage experience on Geoff’s blog including a picture of me being attended to by Melissa (oooooh) from urban chill (great massage, but ditch the Flash on your website, guys)

The E Word – Policy Unplugged

I’m at the Channel 4 HQ in Horseferry Road at a cafe style session on education policy. About 50 interesting and vociferous people have gathered to talk about Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship, well at least that’s what Channel 4 wants them to talk about – we’ll see how that actually works out.

We’re just going into an Open Space session to pull out what people are really interested in.

As usual, pics and flicks later on.

Our Social World sampler

Rather than wait until I’ve got my act completely together to put something else together (a pattern is emerging here) here’s a (highly compressed) sampler of speakers from Our Social World, in speaking order: Ben Hammersley, Simon Phipps, Tom Coates, Johnnie Moore, Lee Bryant, Loic Le Meur, (lunch) Euan Semple, Suw Charman, Julian Bond, Simon Grice, Max Niederhofer, Colin Donald and Ross Mayfield [sadly the overrun meant that I’d gone before Hugh spoke]

Still, hope it conveys a flavour of the day.

If anyone featured would like higher quality clips of their bit, do give me a shout.

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Librivox – The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad, Chapter 7

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[UPDATE: after all the audio problems earlier it should be fine now]

Librivox is an experiment initiated by Hugh McGuire from Montreal to see whether a bunch of interested volunteers can create collaboratively some totally free audiobooks in the public domain. We are taking texts from Project Gutenberg (one of the first resources I ever fell in love with on the internet in about 1992), reading them in chunks and distributing the files as podcasts.

The first project has been The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad and this is my contribution Chapter 7 (10.9MB, 30:52 mins) in which the Assistant Commissioner visits Sir Ethelred (a great personage of Parliament) to discuss progress on the investigation into a recent bombing in London, after which he takes a cab to Soho, planning to confront Verloc whom he strongly (and correctly) suspects of involvement in the anarchist outrage.

Plus ça change…

Note: unlike other material on this blog, which is released under a creative commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence, I am releasing this file into the public domain – you may do with it entirely as you wish.

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podcastconuk: Paul Nicholls

Legal issues facing podcasters.

podcastpaul.com & podlawyer.com

Freedom of speech

There’s a lot to the legal side of podcasting than can I use the Blind Date theme tune. Legislation hasn’t caught up with what’s happening.

Is speech really free? You can say what you like until you tread on someone’s toes. We have a lot more than, say, China. We’re not allowed to say anything we want. It depends on where you say it and who you say it to.

Here in the UK, we are pretty liberal – you can’t take property or life belonging to another, they are policed by the state and we know we can’t do them. but civil actions are taken by the individual.

Defamation – two types – slander, the spoken word & libel, the ‘permanent’ form – in such a way as to ‘arouse feelings of pity’ Mere taunts (name-calling in the heat of the moment) are not enough.

What about podcasting? The law doesn’t move quickly with new technologies. Theatres Act 1968 – actionable if a theatrical production ridicules someone. Broadcasting Act 1990 applies to Radio and TV and treats defamation as a libel. Podcasting doesn’t fit yet.

There is no definitive answer, but if you defame somebody it would be actionable, but might take a lot more argument than in other media.

He’s had to deal with a defamation case already. Someone had talked to someone in a pub on a podcast and had interviewed someone else who referred to him as “that bloke who takes his clothes off down the arts centre”. Ended up not being defamation.

It’s not going to be a police matter, but individuals or corporations might sue.

Evidence needed – implying a criminal act punishable by imprisonment, implying sexual/contagious disease, imputation of sexual unchastity (for women), disparaging in office or profession (lowering their standing in the eyes of right-thinking people).

Innuendo – not just smutty eg Tolly vs JS Fry & Sons 1931. They used him in a chocolate ad which Tolly said prostituted his amateur status.

You can’t defame a class of people, I have to be able to draw an inference about an individual.

Defences – why do they go into such huge detail when reporting about people committing offences? It’s to avoid defaming other people who could be confused. If in trouble, take advice. Offers to make amends and limit damage, what you said might be justifiable or fair comment & in the public interest.

Don’t forget incitement or conspiracy (eg to corrupt public morals) So basically think before you open your gob and if you get a writ, take advice.

Q: jurisdiction? England & Wales applies to us. But it depends.

Q: Can you get legal aid for defamation. You are seen as guilty? Yes that’s right. That’s why we have no win, no fee. The burden of proof is on the other party.

Q:

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