Tag Archives: london

Videoblog: 160624 “Independence” Day

It felt important to put another link in the chain today even though I didn’t feel like talking much.  Processing… processing… processing.

Shock is a weird thing, it will be interesting to look back on this once it’s passed.  Thanks to all who came to Tuttle this morning to share their experience of shock, grief, acceptance, tolerance and love.  More will be revealed!

Also I need to experiment more with this new camera so that I’m not all out of focus🙂

SE1 here I come #backtowork

From Monday 20th, all being well, I’ll be starting to work from the Concrete Basement in Lower Marsh (home of Anthony Epes and some new friends) – I know I’ve been down in the basement there before sometime, perhaps one of you can own up to also being there, to help me with my failing memory…

Lower Marsh is a great little street that’s feels like it’s been on the edge of gentrification for as long as I’ve been hanging out in London.  That feeling might be accelerating a bit at the moment (key indicator: new, funky coffee shops) but isn’t that everywhere?  And it’s been remarkably resilient given that it’s slap bang next to Waterloo Station.  The other plus for me is that there are three major theatres and the Southbank Centre all in walking distance.

Anyway, that’s where I’m going to be hanging out for the time being.  I shall kick off with some self-appointed Social Artist in Residence stuff, for the space and for the street, but I shall also be focusing on getting Tuttle consulting going again and hoping to use local venues for Open Spaces looking at the human experience of work, technology, economy ‘n’that.  Other ideas for collaborative projects always welcome.

Please come and see me, bring exotic teas, stories of “one time, I was in Lower Marsh and…” and perhaps something small but inspiring to put on the wall or sit on my desk.

 

I need a place to work (and it’s more than a desk with power and wifi)

Five years ago, when I decided to go nomadic (and ended up living and working with others around the country for the next twelve months) it was largely because I’d realised that while I needed somewhere to live, the place I was in wasn’t working for me and it seemed that nothing in the market was really for me either. I didn’t want to move out of London for good, but I also didn’t want to stay. I didn’t want to live on my own and I didn’t want to move in with someone else (yet). I didn’t want to get a job and I didn’t want to work on my own. I wanted something else but I found it really difficult to articulate what it was. But I did find it over time. I found stimulation in the variety of people that I worked and lived with. I found rest on the road, knowing each time that I was moving again that new possibilities were opening up.
So now I’m settled, I like where I live, I’m married again, but I’m restless around work. I’m mostly working from the dining room table and sitting in coffee shops (or theatres!) and I’m feeling the need for a workplace that goes beyond the basic needs of desk, power, wifi. I need people and I need space to host in. I think of new invitations for open spaces and unconferences practically every day and they include working through some of the ideas around co-operative knowledge work with #tuttle that I wrote about before I went to America last month. I don’t know whether anything among the current crop of co-working spaces might be close enough – I definitely want to be part of a community rather than just another desk-renter.

I don’t know much more, but I was reminded by a wise friend yesterday that my best work comes when I express as much as I know and let others fill in the last 20% rather than trying to hide away until I have something finished.

So help me fill the gaps in this. Or y’know, put your earbuds back in and get back to what you were doing.

From The Archive: No Hunting Like Snowhunting (2006) with @debbiedavies

Once upon a time, early in 2006, I sat on the floor in Debbie Davies’s flat in Dolphin Square, cradling a cup of tea and explaining to her that I wanted to start a videoblog and that I thought she should be in it too.  I explained what it would entail, that we’d make a video and put it on the internet and then we’d see what happened.  She thought I was a bit mad but then, she’s a bit mad too so she said yes.

Well this was the first.  It hasn’t been seen for a while because it was too early for YouTube and I stopped paying for the hosting it was on.  Wait… Too early for YouTube? Yes, I think I had an account, but there was an upload limit (10MB?) and this wouldn’t fit.  So the next in the series “Desperately Seeking Harvey” ended up being my first video on YouTube.  And now the kids think they invented this kind of vlogging in 2009…

We were also too early for Twitter and Facebook, so unless you were subscribing to my blog at the time, it’s unlikely you’ve seen it either.  A lost classic…

In summary, the plot is this: Lloyd & Debbie hear that there’s snow forecast north of London and so get in Debbie’s car to drive until they find snow at which point they’ll make a snowman and go home.  Little do they know just how far away the snow is…

 

Podcast: Muki Kulhan on working with young people for #IWD2016 @mukiapproved

Download (8MB)

We bundled Muki into the back of our cab and drove her round the block, asking her about what IWD means to her and what’s good about it.  She talks about the challenges of sexism and being judged adversely at work. But her hope for the future is rooted in her recent mentoring work with younger people including London360, Apps for Good and the BBC micro:bit.

Helen Keegan and I spent International Women’s Day interviewing women (and some men) in tech (and other sectors!) in London about their experience of gender in the workplace and where we’re at with equality. We’re releasing the audio as podcasts over the next couple of days with minimal editing. We will produce a digest of all the conversations later in the week.

 

Podcast: Nathalie Richards of @edukitters & Jane van Aken of @cabapp #IWD2016

Download (15MB)

Jane started in nursing and healthcare management and then changed course to join CabApp to do business development. Nathalie worked at Accenture, KPMG and Apple before founding her social enterprise EduKit which helps school find youth service support for pupils.

You’ll hear about their journeys in their respective careers, their experience of pay inequality, Jane’s idea of #ThisWomanCan to help bring women back to work in ways they might not first think of, the barriers girls and women face in technology, how language is used to treat men and women differently in the workplace, systemic and institutional prejudice, and some top tips for women helping themselves, finding helpful peers and mentors as well as a round up of their thoughts for the future.

Helen Keegan and I spent International Women’s Day interviewing women (and some men) in tech (and other sectors!) in London about their experience of gender in the workplace and where we’re at with equality. We’re releasing the audio as podcasts over the next couple of days with minimal editing. We will produce a digest of all the conversations later in the week.

Podcast: Catherine Mulligan @API_Economics of the Future Cities Catapult @futurecitiescat #IWD2016

Download (5MB)

Cathy talks to us about the importance of including and attracting more women in building the future; the importance of support from family and teachers; actively explaining what an exciting career engineering can be; she also tells us about the work of the Future Cities Catapult

Helen Keegan and I spent International Women’s Day interviewing women (and some men) in tech (and other sectors!) in London about their experience of gender in the workplace and where we’re at with equality. We’re releasing the audio as podcasts over the next couple of days with minimal editing. We will produce a digest of all the conversations later in the week.